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3 Homecomings, Madi nan Ayiti (Tuesday in Haiti)

Livesay Haiti - Jul. 8, 2014 - 6:24 pm
Jacqueline & Family with newborn baby girl, Esther
Andrena and the Francois Family with newborn baby, Michelet Lovelie (right) with her Mom, Grandma, and newborn son, Beaconlove, being held by Gran

The "Postpartum wing" (fancy terminology for a couple of beds and a table in room unattached to the Maternity Center) cleared almost all the way out today. Three of four new Moms went home this afternoon. 

Only Guerda and tiny Sophonie remain (for now). They are doing great, by the way.

We all loaded into the wonderfully reliable ambulance (best purchase ever - thank you donors!) and headed toward Jacquline's house first.  Jacqueline delivered on Saturday. Her husband was excited to see her and was sure to say "gracias" to us many times  - even though we all speak Kreyol, not Spanish. 

Next we went to Andrena's house. She delivered Sunday evening. The soccer game was about to start so we quickly took photos so that Andrena's husband could get back to the television.  Andrena's elderly mother was there to greet us too. She told us she had 10 children in her life. 3 that have died and 7 living. She was wonderfully cute.

After we left Andrena's house, we went several miles to drop Lovelie off at home. She lives in a wood pre-fab house that was put up after the earthquake as "temporary" shelter. She lives with her young mother and grandmother. She has done a great job nursing her son for his first 9 days of life and seemed ready to go home.  

We will see all of these ladies and babies again next Tuesday when they come for class. 

Your gifts, your generosity, your prayers (please please continue) help these women have a safe birth in a place where they are treated with love and respect. They are given the time to bond, begin breastfeeding, and recover, before they head back to the daily grind of life in Haiti. 

We are thrilled that they have this unique opportunity to be cared for, pampered, and loved.  Every women deserves this. 

Andrena, her mother, newborn son named Michelet 
Categories: Haitian blogs

Martelly Regime Targets KOD’s Oxygène David

HaitiAnalysis - Jul. 7, 2014 - 10:25 pm
by Kim Ives (Haiti Liberte)
According to several radio stations in Haiti, there is a warrant for the arrest of Oxygène David, a prominent leader of the party Dessalines Coordination (KOD) and the popular organization Movement for Liberty and Equality of Haitians for Fraternity (MOLEGHAF).            While Oxygène’s lawyer, Mario Joseph, is trying to verify at the courthouse if there is indeed a complaint against Oxygène or if an investigating judge may have issued an arrest warrant, KOD put out a statement on Jun. 25 informing human rights groups and the public that “Oxygène David has had to go into hiding because the Martelly-Lamothe government wants to intimidate him” because of his political mobilization “calling for the resignation of Martelly and Lamothe and the departure of MINUSTAH,” the UN’s 6,600-soldier military occupation force.
            Many speculate that talk of an arrest warrant for Oxygène may well be targeted to the fact that “on Sunday Jun. 8, KOD and MOLEGHAF members in Fort National prevented, through their mobilization, the Martelly cortege from distributing Brazil and Argentina T-shirts in this poor neighborhood [of the capital] which was heavily damaged by the 2010 earthquake and whose earmarked reconstruction funds have been plundered by the gangs in power,” said the KOD statement.            The statement goes on to specify that large SUVs, some marked “Police” but without license plates, were slowly cruising through Fort National, where Oxygène David lives, all during the night of Jun. 23. “Since the opening of the World Cup in Brazil, one has seen each evening an increase in fixed posts and mobile patrols of masked men driving in vehicles with blackened glass and without license plates,” the KOD statement says.            Lawyer Newton St. Juste also put out a similar statement warning about the targeting of Oxygène David. Both St. Juste and KOD said that other targeted militants include James Samuel Jean, Fritz Robert, and Adelson Voyard.            In the summer of 2012, the Martelly government imprisoned Oxygène for over two months. “Oxygène was charged with vandalism of a white Nissan SUV belonging to the executive of Haiti's telecommunications bureau, CONATEL,” reported Meena Jagannath of the Dissident Voice. “However, while the charges indicated Oxygene smashed a window of the car with a rock during the protest, Oxygene maintained that he never saw the car described in the complaint. The police simply arrived and singled him out without reason,” but “it became evident that there was no evidence to support the charges against Oxygène,” who was released on Aug. 30, 2012.            Jagannath also reports that “in an interview after his release, Oxygène said that he had received a warning before his arrest from a Martelly supporter who urged Oxygène to be prudent because he would be imprisoned if he did not stop protesting against the Martelly government's policies. Oxygène mentioned that while in prison, he was offered his release if he accepted a position in the Martelly government.” Oxygène refused the deal, preferring to stay in prison “a long, long time” if necessary.            “As the people’s mobilization grows, we are seeing the teeth and claws of the Martelly regime coming out more and more,” Oxgène David told Haïti Liberté. “From Cap Haïtien to Ile à Vache, people are protesting against the regime. That is why it is important to build a fighting organization like KOD. A structured organization is essential to not only lead the masses in struggle, but to withstand the counterattack and repression that we know will inevitably come.”

Categories: Haitian blogs

Revolution vs. Counter-Revolution

HaitiAnalysis - Jul. 7, 2014 - 10:23 pm
by Berthony Dupont (Haiti Liberte)
This week, the United States of America will celebrate the 238th anniversary of its Declaration of Independence. “On July 4th, 1776, a small band of patriots declared that we were a people created equal, free to think and worship and live as we please, that our destiny would not be determined for us, it would be determined by us,” said U.S. President Barack Obama at a White House ceremony last year. “At that time in human history, it was kings and princes and emperors who made decisions. But those patriots knew there was a better way of doing things, that freedom was possible, and that to achieve their freedom, they’d be willing to lay down their lives, their fortune and their honor. And so they fought a revolution.”            This is the misleading version of United States history that every American school-child learns. But this myth has been exploded by historian Gerald Horne with his new book “The Counter-Revolution of 1776: Slave Resistance and the Origins of the United States of America,” published two months ago by New York University Press.
            “We should understand that July 4th, 1776, in many ways, represents a counterrevolution,” Dr. Horne explained in an interview about the book on Jun. 27 with the program Democracy Now. “That is to say that what helped to prompt July 4th, 1776, was the perception amongst European settlers on the North American mainland that London was moving rapidly towards abolition. This perception was prompted by the ‘Somerset’s case,’ a case decided in London in June 1772 which seemed to suggest that abolition, which was going to be ratified in London itself, was going to cross the Atlantic and basically sweep through the [North American] mainland, thereby jeopardizing numerous fortunes, not only based upon slavery, but the slave trade.”            It has often been noted that the “unalienable Rights” of “Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness” demanded by the slave-owner and principal Declaration of Independence drafter Thomas Jefferson did not extend to the 500,000 African slaves who made up about 20% of the 2.5 million people inhabiting the 13 break-away colonies. It did not apply to women either.            But Dr. Horne’s book  illustrates how this exclusion was not the result of simple oversight or opportunist hypocrisy. “1776 can fairly be said to have eventuated as a counter-revolution of slavery,” Dr. Horne writes in his book. “ Defenders of the so-called Confederate States of America [during the U.S. Civil War] were far from bonkers when they argued passionately that their revolt was consistent with the animating and driving spirit of 1776.”            Indeed, one understands better the reproach that the American founding fathers made “to our British brethren” in their Declaration of Independence. “We have warned them from time to time of attempts by their legislature to extend an unwarrantable jurisdiction over us.” Their principal concern: that slavery and the slave trade would be outlawed.            The birth of Haiti, the second independent nation of the Western Hemisphere, stands in stark counterpoint to that of its northern neighbor. It was a true revolution, aimed at forever ending slavery, not preserving it.            Consider the words pronounced by General Jean-Jacques Dessalines on Jan. 1, 1804 in the city of Gonaïves: “It is not enough to have expelled the [French] barbarians who have bloodied our land for two centuries; it is not enough to have restrained those ever-evolving factions that one after another mocked the specter of liberty that France dangled before you. We must, with one last act of national authority, forever assure the empire of liberty in the country of our birth. We must take any hope of re-enslaving us away from the inhuman government that for so long kept us in the most humiliating torpor. In the end we must live independent or die.”            Unfortunately, the primitive accumulation of capital by the newly emerged United States bourgeoisie through its inhuman crimes helped make it the super-power it is today. As Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. observed: “We have deluded ourselves into believing the myth that capitalism grew and prospered out of the Protestant ethic of hard work and sacrifices. Capitalism was built on the exploitation of black slaves and continues to thrive on the exploitation of the poor, both black and white, both here and abroad.”            Furthermore, Dr. King observed that the U.S. “was born in genocide when it embraced the doctrine that the original American, the Indian, was an inferior race... We are perhaps the only nation which tried as a matter of national policy to wipe out its indigenous population. Moreover, we elevated that tragic experience into a noble crusade.”            In contrast to the American founding fathers, who denounced the “merciless Indian Savages” in their Declaration, the victorious slaves of the former French colony of St. Domingue renamed their new nation “Haiti,” the original Arawak name for the entire island, meaning “mountainous land.”             Haiti is, in fact, the world’s first nation to truly defend “liberty, equality, and fraternity” – the French Revolution’s watchwords – by opposing slavery and the extermination of the Native Americans.            These founding Haitian principles have deprived the nation of the great capital that can be extracted from exploitation, theft of land, and imperialist aggression. Haiti’s poverty also was contributed to when the U.S. refused to recognize Haiti for six decades (much as it embargoes revolutionary Cuba today) and militarily occupied our country for 36 years out of the past century, most recently though the United Nations proxy force, MINUSTAH.            Indeed, today, just as in time of Thomas Jefferson, the U.S. seeks to destroy our 1804 revolution by making us again a slave colony. In the past decade, their two principal thrusts have been 1) to land an occupation army in 2004 and 2) to intervene in our sovereign 2010/2011 elections to put in place a neo-colonial puppet regime, that of President Michel Martelly and Prime Minister Laurent Lamothe. Their goal is to re-enslave us in the sweatshop free trade zones of of SONAPI, CODEVI, and Caracol, and to steal the wealth from our “mountainous land,” in particular the $20 billion worth of gold dust left behind by the Spanish conquistadors who annihilated the Arawaks.
            So, on this July 4, therefore, let us renew our allegiance to the call that General Dessalines made to all Haitians – both our ancestors and those of us living today – at the end of his January 1, 1804 declaration: “Vow before me to live free and independent, and to prefer death to anything that will try to place you back in chains.”
Categories: Haitian blogs

a long ride, a birth, a sunday in ayiti

Livesay Haiti - Jul. 7, 2014 - 1:32 am




Most women begin the Prenatal program in their first trimester. The majority of the ladies start around week 9 of their pregnancy. We like them to join as early as possible, to get in on the teaching, community, vitamins, and iron. 

On occasion we meet a lady that is further along in her pregnancy that we have a gut sense we should accept.  Beth McHoul recalls interviewing Andrena at the 20 to 22 week mark in her pregnancy and upon hearing about a previous stillbirth at home, she felt strongly that Andrena should be accepted even though she was later than our ideal gestational age for acceptance.

Andrena arrived at the Maternity Center around 8pm tonight.  She said she left her house before the contractions got "hot" because the ride is long to get us. She came with her niece who left shortly after making sure her aunt was going to be staying over night.  Andrena walked outside the Maternity Center for about 45 minutes before getting tired and coming in to rest a bit. 

By 9:40, without so much as a single loud noise, she welcomed her fourth child, a little boy.  For all the midwives and L& D nurses out there, Haitian women have insanely-short second stage(s). It seems odd to us when we have the occasional 90 minute second stage.  Andrena wins the second stage award for this summer. It lasted 22 seconds, and baby came with one small push.

Congrats to Andrena, and welcome to the world outside, little baby-guy.



We have purchased land and our long term goal is a larger (second location) Maternity Center.  The money that has been raised specifically for the new MC, has been put toward that specific project. The foundation is in place and the walls have been started. We are a long way from completion of that new larger center. 

For now we operate from one location, an adorable little house (that we all love) that allows us to have about 40 to 45 pregnant woman enrolled in the program at a time. As one delivers and switches to the Early Childhood program, we can accept a newly pregnant woman in her spot. We would love nothing more than to make better use of this house and do some remodeling here that would allow space to increase our numbers to closer to 60 pregnant women at one time.  

We are in need of help networking and finding connections to those that have a heart for Haitian women/children and want to reduce the number of children in orphanages.  

If your church or group or foundation or organization wants to help in the area of maternal health and orphan prevention (which IS in fact, "orphan care") please let us know if we can share more about our programs and whom we can contact. 

Like most non-profits, we are always looking for funding. We are a small, grass-roots organization with room and a desire to grow slowly. Social Media is great for sharing the message of what we do, we feel so supported in that way, but it doesn't typically equal long-term funding. We'd love to speak to your foundation or committee and share what is happening here. 

Interested in helping us? Click this link to go to a donation page. 

Interested in helping fund a midwife to live/serve here? Click here, Beth Johnson is currently raising funds to extend her time in Haiti. 
Categories: Haitian blogs

a walk, a birth, a saturday in ayiti

Livesay Haiti - Jul. 5, 2014 - 9:54 pm



Some of the things (in no particular order) the women hear in Prenatal class are: 1) Drink water drink water, drink more water  2) take your vitamins and iron daily 3) when you are in labor, walking will help you progress 4) nurse your baby right away and after that nurse often.

Jacqueline, a mom expecting her fourth child, said that last night her pain seemed false. She went to bed and slept through the night. This morning she woke up and quickly realized that the pain she was feeling was no longer false. She didn't have any money to take a tap-tap so she started walking toward the Maternity Center. She walked for what she guesses was 45 to 60 minutes and arrived to the Maternity Center almost ready to push. Her 7 pound daughter was born 15 minutes after she arrived. 

When Beth Johnson commented on how fast it all went she said, "Yes, I walked!"

Tonight Jacqueline and her daughter are resting, recovering, and getting to know one another at the Heartline Maternity Center. 

Categories: Haitian blogs

Cérémonie de remise de décoration au Palais National

Carel Pedre's Flickr Stream - Jun. 2, 2013 - 8:37 am

carelp posted a photo:

A droite du couple présidentiel, l'artiste Rodrigue Milien et le Père Antoine Occide Jean (Père Sicot). A gauche, le musicien Raoul Guillaume, la Ministre de la Culture, Mme Josette Darguste, et le Dr Didier Armand, représentant de Mimi Barthélémy.

Categories: Haitian blogs

Cérémonie de remise de décoration au Palais National

Carel Pedre's Flickr Stream - Jun. 2, 2013 - 8:37 am

carelp posted a photo:

Vue partielle de l'assistance à la cérémonie de remise de décoratiion au Palais National

Categories: Haitian blogs

Cérémonie de remise de décoration au Palais National

Carel Pedre's Flickr Stream - Jun. 2, 2013 - 8:37 am

carelp posted a photo:

Le Père Antoine Occide Jean (Père Sicot), Sociologue et Ethnologue, est décoré de l'Ordre National Honneur et Mérite au Grade de Grand Officier pour sa contribution au développement communautaire

Categories: Haitian blogs

Cérémonie de remise de décoration au Palais National

Carel Pedre's Flickr Stream - Jun. 2, 2013 - 8:37 am

carelp posted a photo:

Photo souvenir entre le récipiendaire et le Chef de l'Etat

Categories: Haitian blogs

Cérémonie de remise de décoration au Palais National

Carel Pedre's Flickr Stream - Jun. 2, 2013 - 8:37 am

carelp posted a photo:

M. Raoul Guillaume, premier compositeur de chants de Noël et grand Mapou de la musique haïtienne, est décoré de l'Ordre National Honneur et Mérite au Grade de Chevalier pour sa constance dans le milieu musical.

Categories: Haitian blogs

Cérémonie de remise de décoration au Palais National

Carel Pedre's Flickr Stream - Jun. 2, 2013 - 8:37 am

carelp posted a photo:

Photo souvenir entre le Président de la République et le Maestro Raoul Guillaume

Categories: Haitian blogs

Cérémonie de remise de décoration au Palais National

Carel Pedre's Flickr Stream - Jun. 2, 2013 - 8:37 am

carelp posted a photo:

D'importantes personnalités ont pris part à la cérémonie de remise de décoration

Categories: Haitian blogs

Cérémonie de remise de décoration au Palais National

Carel Pedre's Flickr Stream - Jun. 2, 2013 - 8:37 am

carelp posted a photo:

L'initiative du Président de la République d'honorer des personnalités haïtiennes est saluée par l'assistance

Categories: Haitian blogs

Cérémonie de remise de décoration au Palais National

Carel Pedre's Flickr Stream - Jun. 2, 2013 - 8:37 am

carelp posted a photo:

Une courte interprétation musicale rappelant les bons moments entre les deux artistes, sous le ragard jovial du Père Sicot

Categories: Haitian blogs

Cérémonie de remise de décoration au Palais National

Carel Pedre's Flickr Stream - Jun. 2, 2013 - 8:37 am

carelp posted a photo:

Photo souvenir. L'artiste Rodrigue Millien n'a pas caché sa joie et sa satisfaction d'être honoré par le Président de la République

Categories: Haitian blogs

Cérémonie de remise de décoration au Palais National

Carel Pedre's Flickr Stream - Jun. 2, 2013 - 8:37 am

carelp posted a photo:

Le Chef de l'Etat décorant Rodrigue Millien pour sa contribution à l'épanouissement de la musique population haïtienne. Décoré de l'Ordre National Honneur et Mérite au Grade de Chevalier, l'artiste a 28 albums à son actif.

Categories: Haitian blogs

Cérémonie de remise de décoration au Palais National

Carel Pedre's Flickr Stream - Jun. 2, 2013 - 8:37 am

carelp posted a photo:

Le Chef de l'Etat et le Dr Didier Armand dans une photo souvenir

Categories: Haitian blogs

Cérémonie de remise de décoration au Palais National

Carel Pedre's Flickr Stream - Jun. 2, 2013 - 8:37 am

carelp posted a photo:

Le Président Michel Joseph Martelly: « J’honore donc aujourd’hui quatre personnalités que je m’enorgueillis de donner en exemple à la Nation. Je propose ainsi à la jeunesse des modèles auxquels ils peuvent avec profit se référer. Je suis sûr que les générations montantes sauront s’inspirer des comportements citoyens dont elles ont fait montre au cours de leur vie pour apporter une pierre valable à la construction de cette Haïti de progrès que j’entends instaurer ».

Categories: Haitian blogs

Cérémonie de remise de décoration au Palais National

Carel Pedre's Flickr Stream - Jun. 2, 2013 - 8:37 am

carelp posted a photo:

Moment de grandes émotions!

Categories: Haitian blogs

Cérémonie de remise de décoration au Palais National

Carel Pedre's Flickr Stream - Jun. 2, 2013 - 8:37 am

carelp posted a photo:

Le Dr Didier Armand a aussi intervenu au nom de Mimi Barthélémy. Il a campé succinctement ce célèbre personnage.

Categories: Haitian blogs